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Perhaps our default view in the west is that what we read in the papers or on news websites, see on TV or hear on the radio is near enough true. But people who have been involved in something reported in the media are sometimes surprised to find that the reports don’t exactly match their personal experience of the event. And when we remember that many professionals in the media appear to believe that good news is not newsworthy, we might indeed become suspicious about the daily diet of news that we are being fed.

But perhaps this can encourage us to discriminate and not to accept at face value what the media presents. If so, here, paraphrased from an ancient spiritual teaching, is a useful rule of thumb: Diminish by a factor of ten all the bad we know, and increase by a factor of ten all the good we know – perhaps this might help us to gain a truer picture of the reality?

It might also help us realise that the gloom that many feel about the future for humanity and the planet need not be a self-fulfilling prophecy. Humanity is better than we are led to believe. Goodwill can, does and will transform communities. There is much to be practical and hopeful about, and good news is the best news there is.

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